Analysis

For many young voters, the pemilu on April 9 was a 'fun activity' full of selfies and cheap coffee, writes Lily Yulianti Farid, who reports on the mood from polling stations across the country.

Journalist and recognised Modi watcher Prakash Nanda forecasts what foreign policy changes are likely under a BJP-led Government. [video]

In this, the first of a series of papers from the Electionwatch/CILIS 2 July seminar, Jemma Purdey explores the carefully pitched strategy behind Prabowo and his Gerindra party.

Picture: Muhammad Nur Abdurrahman 

Infuriated Prabowo Subianto has formally challenged the election result, but the odds of his claim succeeding are stacked high against him. Tim Lindsey and Simon Butt explain why. Image: Getty

Initial poll results from Indonesia have people questioning the 'Jokowi Effect', writes Dave McRae.

Favourite Joko Widodo's run to the Presidential Palace appears to be on track. Professor Tim Lindsey explains why Australians should be hoping that he doesn't stumble. Photo: Flickr/Danuprimanto https://flic.kr/p/68ZuxP

Prabowo is the more worldly traveller, but Jokowi is more vocal on foreign relations. Colin Brown analyses the implications for the wider world of this week's poll.

Many influential Indonesians perceive Australia as arrogant. Overcoming this is an immediate challenge, and reminds us much depends on how Australia handles bilateral relations under a new president, says Dave McRae. Image: Getty

Joko Widodo is seen as the most committed to human rights of Indonesia’s potential leaders, but what priority the next Government will give to dealing with the nation's dark history remains unclear, writes Katharine McGregor and Jemma Purdey.

With only two candidates in the field, and their running mates and coalitions finally declared, Lily Yulianti Farid provides a formguide to the race to the Presidential Palace. Image: Getty

On election day, Dave McRae reflects on the twists and turns of a campaign that defied all expectations, and contemplates the future - whatever the result.

Photo: Getty 

The unanimous and unequivocal decision of Indonesia’s Constitutional Court last week has finally brought Indonesia’s presidential election process to a close.  The victory of Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and, his deputy, former vice president,  Jusuf Kalla, is now widely accepted as legitimate, says Director of the Asian Law Centre at the University of Melbourne Law School, Professor Tim Lindsey.

Last week's parlimentary election did not boost the hopes of those seeking reform in Indonesia, argues Dirk Tomsa. This is a summary of his presentation to the University of Melbourne forum "The Indonesian Election: What Really Happened".

 

As political campaigns become more slick, the price of party success skyrockets, encouraging corruption. Thomas Reuter explores how this plays out in Indonesia, and suggests some solutions.

Social media has been pivotal in this campaign, and is today being enlisted by worried citizens to try to expose fraud at the ballot box. Lily Yulianti Farid tracks a net-citizens' movement.

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