Analysis

The biggest surprise of the Indonesian poll was not, Ucu Martanto argues, the muted 'Jokowi' factor, but the large increase in voter turnout.

Sofyan Syamsul, an East Indonesia-based photographer, followed Jokowi's running mate Jusuf Kalla on the campaign trail in her home town of Makassar.

Jokowi dan Prabowo masing-masing mengklaim diri sebagai pemenang Pilpres 2014. Bagaimana hal ini bisa terjadi? Diane Zhang menguraikan mengapa sejumlah quick count yang kredibel memenangkan Jokowi, serta apa implikasinya bagi Indonesia ke depan.

The yearning of Indonesia's growing middle-class for an administration that is clean, competent and tackles endemic corruption seems set to stir a watershed vote, writes Tim Lindsey.

Del Irani from the ABC Australia Network program #talkaboutit spent time at the University of Melbourne in mid-April talking with students about their views on the Indonesian elections.

One candidate accuses the Australian Government of  “phobia”, the other of a “lack of trust”. As Avery Poole explains, the signals for Australia-Indonesia relations are not good, regardless of who wins on 9 July. 

With the official naming of the next President still six days away, Indonesian "netizens" concerned about election honesty have taken activism to a new level, uploading raw "real count" data and tallying it themselves. Lily Yulianti Farid explains.

Under the law, quotas for female representation in Indonesia appear remarkably progressive. In reality, the political realm is still hard going for women, Lily Yulianti Farid explains.

Indonesians are among the most enthusiastic users of social media in the world, and their tweets and posts are having a powerful effect on the 2014 election. But candidates seduced by virtual campaigning still risk losing critical constituencies, argues Ismail Fahmi

How voters respond to the spoken, and unspoken, language of masculinity permeating the Indonesian campaign will provide a telling glimpse into the national mindset, argues Hani Yulindrasari.

Religion played an unprecedented role in the 2014 Indonesian election campaign. Ahmad Imam Mujadid Rais explores how and why faith became a political weapon, and ponders the implications.

The University of Melbourne's Professor Tim Lindsey is interviewed on ABC AM about Australia-Indonesia relations as Indonesians head to the polls this morning.

Presidential frontrunner 'Jokowi' is urging a "mental revolution" to a more optimistic, self-sustaining, self-believing Indonesia, invoking the language and ideas of the Sukarno era, observes Katharine McGregor.

Image: President Sukarno, Washington DC, 1956.

Jokowi's early lead has vanished, and now this polarising presidential election is too close to call, says Dave McRae.

Over the howls of rival Prabowo's extraordinary protests, 'Jokowi' has secured the presidency by over 8 million votes in the official count. 

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